Apprenticeship hub

There are a wide range of opportunities for those interested in starting a career in the beer and pub sector, with apprenticeships from brewing and hospitality, to catering and even engineering, all available for those who may not necessarily want to go to university but want to kick start their career in an exciting employment route. If you already work in our sector, then an apprenticeship offers you a great opportunity to improve your skills and progress in your job.

Across the UK, almost 900,000 people are employed in the beer and pub sector, with just almost half of those being aged 25 and under. Apprenticeships play a crucial role for employers to recruit and retain great employees. There are currently 14 different apprenticeships standards in the hospitality and catering sector, at a range of levels. There is also an exciting, newly established, brewing apprenticeship.

Read below for further information on all of the apprenticeships, and to find out more information you can find a number of links in the sidebar.

HOSPITALITY APPRENTICESHIPS

Apprenticeships are an excellent way of progressing in the hospitality sector. The variety of roles available can help you to find your perfect job and develop the skills necessary to work in the industry. Working in hospitality gives you an opportunity to work in a diverse workforce with plenty of opportunity for progression, in an exciting job where no two days are the same. Starting as an apprentice gives you the opportunity to combine employment and training, giving you the chance to earn money whilst you learn key skills necessary for your future career. Apprenticeships are available at a number of levels in the sector. Depending on experience, you will have the opportunity to gain core hospitality knowledge, skills and behaviour. On top of learning the core principles, as an apprentice you will be able to learn specialist functions, from understanding the complex requirements of serving beer and cask ale, to learning skills in mixology or wine service.

CATERING APPRENTICESHIPS

There are a number of catering apprenticeships available which can help you progress in your career as a chef, opening up a range of opportunities such as becoming a pub chef. From a level 2 'Commis Chef' apprenticeship, to Level 3 'Chef de Partie', chef's just starting their career, or those wanting to progress further, can find a great opportunity to learn basic and advanced cooking skills, as well as how to work in a team in a time-bounding and challenging environment. There are 4 catering apprenticeships available in total, all approved by the Institute of Apprenticeships. Links to these apprenticeships can be found in the sidebar.

BREWER APPRENTICESHIP

Working as an apprentice in a brewery will help you to develop the niche skills required to produce beer at all stages of production. Working as a brewer requires a variety of skills in a diverse and unique role. Brewer apprentices will learn not only how to brew beer, but how to understand regulatory requirements, design and development of new brands or the design and operation of equipment. The brewer trailblazer is approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships and delivered at Level 4.

BREWER APPRENTICESHIP - NEXT STEPS

In the sidebar you will find a number of links where you can find out more on how to become a brewer apprentice. For more information on the Trailblazer, access requirements or to register interest in delivering the Trailblazer please contact Steve Livens at the BBPA. If you would like to register your interest as a learner and are not currently employed within the industry please fill out the contact form found on this page with some information about yourself. We will then get in contact with you.

  • Beer & Pub sector comment on DRS with one year to go

    16 August 2022

    Commenting on Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) due to go live one year to the day and the release of the producer fees, Emma McClarkin, CEO of the Scottish Beer & Pub Association said: “With just one year to go before Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme is set to start operating, there is a lot of work still to be done. Establishing producer fees is critical so producers can plan ahead and assess the impact on their businesses. Unfortunately, this will put even more financial pressure on both brewers and pubs at a very difficult time as they battle with soaring energy costs and labour shortages. The combination of a deposit and additional producer fees, themselves very significant amounts, will particularly impact products such as beer sold in smaller single-serve containers, often as part of multipacks. “The Scottish Government have shown that they are mindful about the cost of doing business and have supported calls for a range of measures, but they need to be acutely aware that the producer fee is just one of a myriad of costs attached to a DRS. Labelling, new IT systems, staff training, security, storage, and fraud risks will all come with significant expenditures. There also remains several elements still to be finalised, such as VAT treatment and the on-line takeback model, that with just a year to go is causing significant concerns among businesses. “We are committed to working alongside the Scottish Government and other stakeholders to deliver the best possible DRS, but without wider relief to the costs of doing business currently we risk losing many of Scotland’s brewers and pubs before DRS even starts.”

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  • Pubs & bars ‘at risk of being forgotten’, say hospitality trade bodies

    10 August 2022

    Scotland’s three major hospitality trade associations, the Scottish Beer & Pub Association (SBPA), Scottish Licensed Trade Association (SLTA), and UKHospitality Scotland (UKHS) have called on the Scottish Government not to exclude pubs from their current proposals which would see other hospitality premises, like restaurants have greater flexibility with on-street seating. As part of the Scottish Government’s Permitted Development Rights consultation (which closed 4 Aug), it is proposed that outdoor restaurant seating could be permitted without a planning application. Under the current proposal however, it would only apply to restaurants and other businesses currently operating as a class 3 businesses (food & drink for consumption on the premises) not pubs or bars. This is due to pubs and bars being classified differently, despite the fact many are now indistinguishable from restaurants and other hybrid venues. In their submissions to the Scottish Government’s consultation, all three trade associations joined together in their call and have today said that Scotland’s pubs and bars can’t be forgotten about. Commenting, Paul Togneri of the Scottish Beer & Pub Association said:“This should be a no brainer for the Scottish Government. Since the planning use classes came into effect, the hospitality industry has changed massively. Many pubs and bars provide almost identical services to restaurants and should be able to benefit from the same relaxation being offered to them. “In normal times, the sector is a powerhouse of the Scottish economy, contributing £1.4bn annually and supporting 54,000 jobs. In addition, every local pub creates on average £100k every year for their local economies. To get the sector and city centres thriving again post-covid, we need support, and this sort of change can be a huge boost to thousands of SMEs across the country. “We saw a relaxation of planning for outdoor areas during the pandemic which gave many premises the ability to trade through an exceptionally difficult period. We’re glad that the Government are now seeking to make some of those relaxations permanent, but it needs to be for the whole of hospitality. Pubs and bars are at risk of being forgotten about.” Scottish Licensed Trade Association Managing Director Colin Wilkinson said:“The Scottish Licensed Trade Association fully supports measures that will aid the road to recovery for the licensed hospitality sector and also help to regenerate our town and city centres, but these proposals must cover all licensed hospitality businesses.“The current exclusion of pubs and bars from the Permitted Development Rights proposal, in our view, is nothing short of discriminatory. Over the last few years pubs and bars have become restaurants and restaurants have become pubs and bars and in operational terms and service offering there is, in our opinion, little to distinguish from the two. If pubs and bars remain excluded from the PDR for moveable furniture we can only see a raft of applications for change of use to a restaurant to avoid this discriminatory measure.“Our sector is extremely envious of the recent development in England where hospitality venues can now benefit from the ability to erect a non-permanent outdoor structure, subject to a number of restrictions and conditions, without planning permission or associated costs. It is incumbent on the Scottish Government to support “all” sectors of the Scottish licensed hospitality industry in this same manner.”UKHospitality Scotland Executive Director Leon Thompson said:“UKHospitality Scotland has consistently called for businesses to be able to make greater use of outdoor space and is supportive of the Scottish Government’s proposal to do this. This move will help the hospitality industry as it works towards recovery, with greater ability to welcome more guests at peak times and appeal to a greater number of customers, as many people prefer and enjoy being seated outside.“However, it is important that pubs and bars are also included in this proposal, not only restaurants and cafes. As well as the support this would give to these licensed premises, it will avoid confusion in deciding what is a pub and what isn't, with many businesses classified as pubs now involved in selling food.“Last month England made pavement licenses permanent, providing potentially business-saving opportunities to hundreds of pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes. Scotland's hospitality businesses should have access to at least the same generous terms.”

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Contact Us

  • For more information or to register your interest, contact the BBPA by filling out this form.